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Center for Health Security announces fellows accepted to Emerging Leaders in Biosecurity class of 2019

February 12, 2019

The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security has accepted 30 professionals and scholars into its Emerging Leaders in Biosecurity Initiative (ELBI) fellowship program for 2019.

This class is the largest and most diverse in program history. Comprising 17 men and 13 women from 13 US states, Canada, and the United Kingdom, the class was chosen from more than 130 applicants through a rigorous selection process. Throughout the year, new fellows will attend 3 multi-day workshops and additional in-person networking opportunities. They’ll also have access to other engagement activities and some of the top minds in domestic and global health security.

“Strong interest in our ELBI program continues to grow among promising practitioners whose biosecurity work is setting direction for the future of the field,” said Tom Inglesby, MD, director of the Center. “I’m thrilled to welcome the 2019 class and look forward to being part of a truly distinctive experience shaped by the unique insight of our newest fellows.”

Now in its seventh year, the highly competitive part-time ELBI fellowship program inspires and connects the next generation of leaders and innovators in the biosecurity community. The program is an opportunity for talented career professionals to deepen their expertise, expand their network, and build their leadership skills through a series of sponsored events coordinated by the Center. This fellowship boasts more than 120 alumni who come from government, defense, private industry, science, law, public health, medicine, global health, journalism, the social sciences, and academia.

The 2019 ELBI Fellows are:

  • Emmanuel Agogo, Nigeria Centre for Disease Control
  • Oluwayemisi Ajumobi, The World Bank
  • Ethan Alley, Center for Effective Altruism & George Church Lab at Harvard Medical School
  • Frances Butcher, Oxford School of Public Health
  • Angel Desai, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Mark Eccleston-Turner, University of Keele
  • Claire Marie Filone, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory
  • Hayden Huang, Government Accountability Office
  • Justin Hurt, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Salah Issa, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture
  • Christine Jones, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Rebecca Kahn, Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics
  • Seth Kroop, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Aditya Kunjapur, University of Delaware
  • Anastasia Lambrou, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Greg Lewis, Future of Humanity Institute
  • Karen Martins, USAMRIID
  • Robert Mayall, University of Calgary, FREDsense Technologies
  • Cody Minks, SSM Health
  • Michelle Murti, Public Health Ontario
  • Michael Parker, McDaniel College
  • Shanna Ratnesar-Shumate, National Threat Characterization Center (NBACC)
  • Brian Renda, Ginkgo Bioworks
  • Emily Ricotta, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
  • Emily Rosenblum, Department of Energy
  • Joseph Simmond-Issler, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI)
  • Jacob Swett, University of Oxford
  • Christine Tomlinson, Applied Research Associates
  • Benjamin Trump, Engineer Research and Development Center - U.S. Army
  • Robert Tuttle, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Center staffers Matthew Watson, Caitlin Rivers, PhD, Crystal Watson, DrPH, Amanda Kobokovich, MPH, and Hannah Ottman-Feeney manage the ELBI fellowship program. It is supported by the Open Philanthropy Project.

About the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security:
The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security works to protect people from epidemics and disasters and build resilient communities through innovative scholarship, engagement, and research that strengthens the organizations, systems, policies, and programs essential to preventing and responding to public health crises. The Center is part of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is located in Baltimore, MD.

 

 

Our Mission

To protect people’s health from epidemics and disasters and ensure that communities are resilient to major challenges.