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Protecting Building Occupants from Exposure to Biological Threats

References

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  31. Persily A. Building ventilation and pressurization as a security tool. ASHRAE Journal 2004;46(9):18–24.
     
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  35. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Guidance for Filtration and Air-Cleaning Systems to Protect Building Environments from Airborne Chemical, Biological, or Radiological Attacks (DHHS (NIOSH) Pub No. 2003-136). Cincinnati, OH. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; April 2003. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2003-136/pdfs/2003-136.pdf. Accessed December 4, 2007.
     
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  52. Canter, DA. Remediating anthrax-contaminated sites: learning from the past to protect the future. Chemical Health and Safety. July/August 2005;12(4): 13-19.
     
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  54. American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 52.2-2007: Method of Testing General Ventilation Air-Cleaning Devices for Removal Efficiency by Particle Size. Atlanta, GA: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc.; 2007.

*Note: The information that appears on the pages collectively known as "Protecting Building Occupants" was up-to-date and accurate when published in 2008; the materials have not been updated since original publication. Please be sure to check current resources for the most up-to-date information on this topic.

 

 

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