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Home > Our Work > Events Archive > 1999 First National Symposium

First National Symposium
on Medical and Public Health Response to Bioterrorism

Overview

The national medical and public health communities, as yet, have not been fully apprised of the problem of bioterrorism and have so far been little involved either in threat assessment or response planning. To remedy this deficit, in February 1999 the National Symposium on Medical and Public Health Response to Bioterrorism brought together medical, public health, government, intelligence, and military experts to consider the following questions. Why are current concerns about bioterrorism real and not inflammatory? Why must the medical and public health communities address the issue of bioterrorism? Which biological threats warrant the greatest concern? What is the possible aftermath of an act of biological terrorism? By pursuing these inquiries through an interdisciplinary dialog, the National Symposium was the first event to bring key players responsible for coordinating a strategic response to an intentional epidemic among the civilian population.


Symposium Sponsors

Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies
US Department of Health and Human Services
Infectious Diseases Society of America

Co-Sponsors

American Society for Microbiology
American College of Preventive Medicine
Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology
Association of Public Health Laboratories
Association of Schools of Public Health
Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Commissioned Officers Association of the U.S. Public Health Service
Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists
National Association of County and City Health Officials
Public Health Foundation
Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America



Agenda

Day 1: Understanding the Threat of Bioterrorism

Published proceedings are available: Emerging Infectious Diseases. Volume 5, Number 4-August 1999


Welcome and Symposium Introduction

  • Donald A. Henderson, MD, MPH, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies

Keynote Address

  • Donna E. Shalala, Secretary, US Department of Health and Human Service

I. Reality of the Threat - Why Is There Concern Now?

  • Introduction: Chair, David Siegrist, The Potomac Institute
  • Russia and Iraq: Christopher Davis, OBE, DPhil, Consultant in Pharmaceutical Medicine and Applied Physiology, Director, The ORAQ Consultancy Ltd.
  • US Militia Movement: Jessica Stern, PhD, Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, Formerly with the National Security Council
  • Aum Shinrikyo: Kyle Olson, MPA, Special Projects Manager, Research Planning, Inc.
  • Historical Trends Related to Bioterrorism: Jason Pate, PhD, Monterey Institute for International Studies (substituted for Jonathan Tucker)

II. Which Biological Threat Agents Are of Highest Concern?

  • Creating the Threat List: Colonel Gerald W. Parker, DVM, PhD, Director, U.S. Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology of Bioterrorism: Major Julie Pavlin, MD, MPH, Chief of Field Studies, Division of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Former Assistant Chief, Operational Medicine Division, US Amy Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases
  • Smallpox: Donald A. Henderson, MD, MPH, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies
  • Anthrax: Colonel Edward M. Eitzen, Jr., MD, MPH, Chief, Division of Operational Medicine, US Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases

III. Biological Terrorism - What Could Happen Here?

  • Anthrax-A Possible Case History: Thomas V. Inglesby, MD, Fellow, Infectious Disease, Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies

IV. Perceptions from the Hill and the Governor's Mansion

  • View from the Hill: S. Anthony McCann, Staff Assistant, Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies, House Appropriations Committee<

Dinner Speaker

  • Richard Clarke, National Coordinator, Security, Infrastructure Protection and Counter-Terrorism, National Security Council


Day 2: Responding to Bioterrorism

Published scenario (referred to below)


I. Scenario-An Intentional Smallpox Epidemic

  • Tara J. O'Toole, MD, MPH
  • Donald Henderson, Chair
  • George Strait, ABC News, Moderator

Panel 1: Threat Intelligence and Diagnosis of Smallpox

  • Emergency Department: Gregory Moran, MD
  • Infectious Disease: John G. Bartlett, MD
  • Hospital: Julie Gerberding, MD
  • City Emergency Management: Jerome H. Hauer, MPH
  • State Health Laboratory: Michael Ascher, MD, FACP
  • State Health Department: Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
  • Governor's Office: Arne Carlson
  • FBI: Robert M. Blitzer

Panel 2: Early Response

  • Emergency Department: Gregory Moran, MD
  • Hospital: Julie Gerberding, MD
  • City Emergency Management: Jerome H. Hauer, MPH
  • State Health Department: Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
  • FBI: Robert M. Blitzer
  • CDC: Scott R. Lillibridge, MD
  • Media: Joanne Rodgers

Panel 3: Quarantine and Vaccination

  • Hospital: Trish Perl, MD, MPH
  • City Emergency Management: Jerome H. Hauer, MPH
  • State Health Department: Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
  • Office of Emergency Preparedness: Robert F. Knouss, MD
  • CDC: Scott R. Lillibridge, MD
  • Mental Health: Robert DeMartino, MD
  • Media: Joanne Rodgers
  • Legal: Terry O'Brien, JD

Panel 4: The Epidemic Expands and Final Discussion

  • Emergency Department: Gregory Moran, MD
  • Infectious Disease: John G. Bartlett, MD
  • Hospital: Julie Gerberding, MD and Trish Perl, MD, MPH
  • City Emergency Management: Jerome H. Hauer, MPH
  • State Health Laboratory: Michael Ascher, MD, FACP
  • State Health Department: Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
  • Governor's Office: Arne Carlson
  • FBI: Robert M. Blitzer
  • CDC: Scott R. Lillibridge, MD
  • Office of Emergency Preparedness: Robert F. Knouss, MD
  • Media: Joanne Rodgers

II. Reprise

  • Applying Lessons Learned: John G. Bartlett, MD, Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies, Professor of Medicine and Chief for the Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

III. Working Lunch: Special Issues-Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals

  • Introduction and Chair: James M. Hughes, MD, Director of The National Center of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • FDA: Kathryn C. Zoon, PhD, Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration

  • Vaccines: Philip K. Russell, MD, Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies, Former Director, U.S. Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases

Concluding Remarks

  • Where Do We Go from Here? Margaret A. Hamburg, MD, Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Services

 

 

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